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Showing posts from September, 2018

P.T. Barnum digital collection

A digital collection has been made of the P.T. Barnum Museum in Connecticut. This occurred after the building sustained major damage from a tornado. Most of the collections also sustained some level of damage. The building is still being repaired and so is still only partially open.
Realizing digitization of the collections was necessary for continued use, the Museum partnered with another institution with Barnum collections, the Bridgeport History Center, part of the Bridgeport Public Library,and applied for a new grant  offered by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Humanities Collections and Reference Resources (HCRR) begun in 2012. The grant would  "fund the work  to identify and prioritize materials for digitization,... the work of developing project-specific selection criteria, evaluating technical requirements, and exploring third-party service arrangements."  In Barnum style the project was called “Planning for ‘The Greatest Digitization Project on Ea…

The Dr. Charles E. and Jeri Baron Feltner Great Lakes Maritime History Collection, 1978, 2018 is cataloged and the finding aid is Google-searchable

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I'm very excited to announce that the finding aid for the Dr. Charles E. and Jeri Baron Feltner Great Lakes Maritime History Collection, 1978, 2018 is now Google-searchable. The collection is physically available at the Clarke Historical Library, and the catalog record and finding aid may be viewed online. The collection is likely one of the top ten marine history research collection in the United States, complied from research collections in national and international historical institutions.

Dr. Charles E. "Chuck" Feltner, born in North Carolina, earned a Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering. A PADI Divemaster, he has searched for, dove on, and documented numerous wrecks around the Great Lakes. He married Jeri Baron Feltner in 1975 and has three sons and five granddaughters. In 1978, the Feltners dove on a shipwreck previously believed to be The Northwest. The wreck ignited a research interest in the Feltners who eventually identified the wreck in 1980 as The Maitland…